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Jerry Seinfeld slams ‘Friends,’ brings back ‘Seinfeld’ characters in new movie promo

This article was originally published at StateOfUnion.org. Publications approved for syndication have permission to republish this article, such as Microsoft News, Yahoo News, Newsbreak, UltimateNewswire and others. To learn more about syndication opportunities, visit About Us.
Jerry Seinfeld

Jerry Seinfeld took a jab at “Friends” in a promo for his new film “Unfrosted.” In the clip, Pop-Tarts accuses Seinfeld of trademark infringement for referencing their breakfasts.

Threaten

“Are you familiar with the concept of trademark infringement?” the fictional Pop-Tarts president asked. “You see Mr. Seinfeld, you took something of ours, and now we’re going to take something of yours. Show him, Tarty.” When they threaten to take one of his characters, Seinfeld jokes “You mean like ‘Friends’?” referencing the sitcom also set in 1990s New York about a group of friends.

My characters

“Schmoopie, Jackie Chiles and the Soup Nazi! My characters!” Seinfeld said. “They’re my characters now, Mr. Seinfeld,” the president said. “Tell me, how does it feel when people steal your ideas and then do whatever they want with them?”

Confusion

“You mean like ‘Friends’?” Seinfeld joked. It’s Seinfeld’s directorial debut after a career in stand-up and his own sitcom. He said filmmaking is “nothing like” TV work and the movie business no longer occupies the same cultural position, with confusion replacing it.

Dead serious

“It was totally new to me,” Seinfeld said. “I thought I had done some cool stuff, but it was nothing like the way these people work. They’re so dead serious! They don’t have any idea that the movie business is over. They have no idea.”

Cultural hierarchy

He noted, “Film doesn’t occupy the pinnacle in the social, cultural hierarchy that it did for most of our lives. When a movie came out, if it was good, we all went to see it. We all discussed it. We quoted lines and scenes we liked. Now we’re walking through a fire hose of water, just trying to see.”

Changing landscape

People in show business constantly wonder what they’re supposed to do now given the changing landscape, he noted.

Groundbreaking

Seinfeld, a groundbreaking sitcom created by Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David, achieved unparalleled success and left an indelible mark on the landscape of television comedy. The show’s unique blend of observational humor, relatable characters, and unconventional storytelling captivated audiences and redefined the sitcom genre. Delving into the factors that contributed to the success of Seinfeld provides valuable insights into its enduring cultural impact and widespread acclaim.

Seinfeld's success

Seinfeld’s success can be attributed, in part, to its innovative approach to comedy. The show departed from traditional sitcom conventions by embracing a “show about nothing” concept, focusing on the everyday experiences and idiosyncrasies of its characters. This unconventional narrative style, characterized by interwoven storylines and mundane yet hilarious plot points, resonated with viewers seeking a departure from formulaic storytelling.

Depression

“Depression? Malaise? I would say confusion,” Seinfeld said. “Disorientation replaced the movie business. Everyone I know in show business, every day, is going, ‘What’s going on? How do you do this? What are we supposed to do now?’”

Memorable characters

The success of Seinfeld was significantly bolstered by the memorable characters and stellar performances of its cast. From Jerry Seinfeld’s affable yet neurotic persona to the eccentricities of George Costanza, Elaine Benes, and Cosmo Kramer, the ensemble cast breathed life into a diverse array of personalities, each contributing distinct comedic elements that became integral to the show’s appeal.

Social norms

Seinfeld’s success transcended mere entertainment, as the show deftly tapped into the zeitgeist of its era while addressing timeless themes. Its exploration of social norms, relationships, and the minutiae of daily life struck a chord with audiences, fostering a sense of cultural relevance and relatability that continues to resonate with viewers across generations.

Profound influence

The show’s success is further underscored by its profound influence on popular culture. Seinfeld introduced iconic catchphrases, such as “yada yada yada,” “no soup for you,” and “master of my domain,” which permeated everyday vernacular and became emblematic of the show’s impact on the cultural lexicon. Its ability to permeate the collective consciousness and shape popular discourse solidified its status as a cultural phenomenon.

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