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Trucker warns Biden admin taking ‘extreme’ measure to put industry ‘out of business’

CBS News
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Trucking industry

via ABC

Trucking industry representatives are criticizing the Biden administration’s new greenhouse gas emissions standards for heavy-duty vehicles. The EPA rules, which will progressively mandate higher percentages of zero-emissions trucks through 2032, are aimed at reducing emissions.

Independent Drivers Association

CBS News

However, the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association argues the standards do not consider operational challenges faced by truckers.

Not listening

CBS News

“This office in the White House is completely not listening to the trucker or the end user or the buyer. They just want to do what the extreme environmentalists want,” Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA) board member Lewie Pugh said.

Higher costs

CBS News

The group noted a lack of charging infrastructure in many areas and higher costs, which could put many small businesses out of business.

Critics

CBS News

Critics question where the funding will come from given the highway trust fund is already underfunded. “And what it’s going to do is put lots and lots of truckers out of business.”

Charge them

CBS News

“Where are we going to charge them? That’s my first question,” Pugh said. “There was a company in Juliet, Illinois, that was going to put a terminal in for 30 trucks. The city said, ‘you can’t do it. You’re going to use more electricity than the entire city of Juliet, Illinois.'”

New standards

CBS News

The recent regulatory actions by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to impose new standards for carbon emissions from heavy-duty trucks have triggered a contentious debate within the trucking industry and among policymakers. The far-reaching implications of these rules, alongside the industry’s concerns about technological readiness and financial impact, have fueled a complex and multifaceted controversy that demands careful examination.

Biden administration

CBS News

The Biden administration’s EPA has pursued an ambitious agenda to address climate change by rolling out a set of regulations aimed at penalizing carbon emissions from various sectors, including power plants, oil wells, passenger cars, and heavy-duty vehicles.

Carbon emissions

CBS News

The finalization of the new standards for carbon emissions from heavy-duty trucks represents a significant step in the administration’s efforts to combat climate change and reduce transportation-related pollution.

Safety risks

CBS News

Critics also warn of safety risks if battery-powered trucks break down in remote areas during harsh weather.

Avoid billions

pixabay

While the EPA says the rules will avoid billions in climate damages, the trucking industry argues the agency did not adequately consider the perspectives of operators in setting standards they view as unrealistic.

Highway trust fund

pixabay

“Our highway trust fund that would pay for stuff like this is already on the brink of going bankrupt. Where is the money going to come from?” Pugh said. “We can’t take care of our infrastructure that we have now, and we’re going to put all this stuff in and then hope it works?”

We can’t do it

pixabay

“[We’re] all saying, there’s no way this is going to work. We can’t do it. They’re concerned about their lives and their livelihood,” Pugh said. “What happens in the wintertime? You get stuck in a snow blizzard along the highway for two or three days and your battery goes, these people could freeze to death and die,” he concluded.

Trucking industry

pixabay

The trucking industry and freight companies have expressed concerns that the new regulations may compel them to transition away from diesel engines before viable electric drivetrains are readily available for long-haul tractor-trailers.

Challenges

pixabay

Challenges related to infrastructure, such as the availability of charging stations and the capacity of electric models to meet the demands of long-haul operations, have been highlighted as significant obstacles.

Costs

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The substantial costs associated with transitioning to zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) have raised apprehensions within the industry, with estimates suggesting that the conversion to zero-emission trucks could amount to over $600 billion, in addition to significant investments required for generating and grid improvements.

Representatives

pixabay

Industry representatives have emphasized the need for a competitive total cost of ownership for ZEVs and underscored the significance of adequate infrastructure to support and operate these vehicles effectively.

Delaying the mandate

pixabay

In response to industry concerns, the EPA made adjustments to the final rule, delaying the mandate for the largest trucks by a few years to address technological and market readiness challenges.

Public health groups

CBS News

Public health groups and environmental advocates have expressed disappointment over what they perceive as a less stringent regulation, emphasizing the urgency to act in addressing air pollution and health hazards.

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This article was originally published at StateOfUnion.org. Publications approved for syndication have permission to republish this article, such as Microsoft News, Yahoo News, Newsbreak,...

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