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ESPN Apologizes After Admitting to Emmy Awards Scheme

via 11Alive.
This article was originally published at StateOfUnion.org. Publications approved for syndication have permission to republish this article, such as Microsoft News, Yahoo News, Newsbreak, UltimateNewswire and others. To learn more about syndication opportunities, visit About Us.

ESPN was found to have created fake names for Emmy Awards to honor on-air talent who were ineligible to receive awards.

The scheme, which had been ongoing since 2010, involved re-engraving statuettes and delivering them to on-air personalities.

The network has apologized, returned the trophies, and undergone a complete overhaul of its submission process. (Trending: Joe Biden Caught In Another Major Lie About J6)

ESPN said in a statement, “Some members of our team were clearly wrong in submitting certain names that may go back to 1997 in Emmy categories where they were not eligible for recognition or statuettes. This was a misguided attempt to recognize on-air individuals who were important members of our production team.”

“Once current leadership was made aware, we apologized to NATAS for violating guidelines and worked closely with them to completely overhaul our submission process to safeguard against anything like this happening again,” continued the network.

Ex-ESPN talent and fake Emmys receiver, Shelley Smith, said, “I think it was really crummy what they did to me and others,”

As a result of the incident, senior leadership received a one-year ban from the Emmys, and two individuals were deemed ineligible for future Emmys.

This scheme was aimed at honoring the talent behind the success of “College GameDay,” as the hosts were not initially eligible for recognition until 2023.

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This article was originally published at StateOfUnion.org. Publications approved for syndication have permission to republish this article, such as Microsoft News, Yahoo News, Newsbreak,...

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